1. Camera: Canon PowerShot SX150 IS
  2. Aperture: f/4.5
  3. Exposure: 1/1600th
  4. Focal Length: 90mm
  1. Camera: Canon PowerShot SX150 IS
  2. Aperture: f/5
  3. Exposure: 1/640th
  4. Focal Length: 158mm

Maulkin’s legs are so fluffy, he leaves little swamp monster pom-poms on the surface of the water.

  1. Camera: Canon PowerShot SX150 IS
  2. Aperture: f/4.5
  3. Exposure: 1/400th
  4. Focal Length: 80mm
Anonymous Asked
QuestionMy dog is nervous any time he leaves the house. Won't take food, is glued to my side, just really bad. He gets this way as soon as we leave the driveway. I want to be able to show him that being out of the house is fun and great, but he's so nervous that it's hard to even get him to look at a high-value treat, let alone eat it. A friend recommended calming chews to help, but I don't know anything about them. Would they help or is there something better I can do? Answer

It sounds like your dog may be beyond what any OTC medication could help. I think you should ask your veterinarian if anti-anxiety medication might be a good option for your dog. Many veterinarians are uncomfortable prescribing psychiatric medication, so if your vet is reluctant to discuss it with you or is just generally unsure, ask to be referred to a veterinary behaviourist.

If you see a behaviourist, they’ll be able to help customize a rehabilitation plan for you and your dog. In the mean time, I recommend just moving very slowly with your dog’s counter-conditioning and training. If he’s uncomfortable taking treats outside, start just sitting inside near the door and feeding him. When he seems happy and relaxed to be near the door, you can open the door and feed him until he’s happy and relaxed there. Then you can take a step outside and reach inside to feed him. Don’t force him to go outside if he’s uncomfortable (and resist the urge to coax him by luring him out with treats); he’ll progress most quickly if he chooses to go out, and stay out, on his own. Always give him the option to go back inside any time he wants. Once he’s decided to come outside and seems comfortable being near the door, gradually move farther and farther from your house. Remember to start each training session nearer to the house than you ended your last session, and expect set-backs. Also try to be sensitive to what’s going on outside. For example, if it’s garbage day and there are bins near the road, you might want to stay inside since lots of dogs are afraid of bins. Even with all the training in the world, there’s no guarantee your dog will ever enjoy walks. Just do the best you can to help your dog feel comfortable outside, and he should become more confident with a bit of practice.

simply-canine:

INFO ABOUT FLEXI-LEADS+PRONG COLLAR DANGER

spottytonguedog:

doggydayjob:

zookeeping:

l am watching my neighbors dog currently, he’s a 100lb big ol goof and when I went to get his walking stuff I realized they do the prong+ flexi-lead combo which I know is bad, but I don’t have any info about why exactly (I can sorta…

Not sure what your definition of small is but my 12 lb Iggy walks fine on both a Flexi and a 6 ft nylon lead. I always use a harness with him though since I don’t want to risk possibly damaging his neck, even though pulling has never been an issue for him.

I’m disturbed that anyone would try to use a Flexi and a prong together though. Really?!

That’s awesome. I don’t think I’ve ever seen anyone with a small dog actually try to train their dog to walk on a Flexi. I’ve just noticed that small dogs walked on Flexi’s tend to pull much harder than small dogs walked on 6 ft leashes. (Thinking about it now, it could in part be caused by the dogs being used to walking so far from their handler in addition to habituation to pressure.) Did you train Iggy to walk on a 6 ft leash or a Flexi first? How well did your training generalize to the other leash?

2ifbifrost:

image

Coincidentally, my mentor really dislikes Susan Garrett, so I’m incredibly sceptical of her training…. I know her recent agility stuff is not so great at least. I’d be interested in seeing Recallers, but not enough to pay for it.

I generally find her training pretty good - I used 2x2 weaves for Redog, and plan to again when Redog 2.0 is older. I use a LOT of IYC/Reverse Luring, and my trainer has trained with her.

I’ve heard the newer material isn’t as impressive. I know a lot of Recallers is outsourced to her students/assistants, but there’s also approximately a million people in it, so. Understandable. But, when you’re paying $500 for her feedback on your training, disappointing.

My big problem, which isn’t really fair, lol, is the marketing she does. I mean, I don’t begrudge her a living, and obviously she can get the prices she sets, I’m just grumbly I don’t value her offerings enough to pay those prices. I’m not a fan of her presentation style. 

My mentor also uses 2x2 weaves and I use reverse luring, but Garrett wasn’t the inventor of those methods. What my mentor really hates is how Garrett has a rule in her agility contracts saying you can’t train with any other trainer when you’re training with her. (I’m not sure why she originally added this rule, but I don’t think a second opinion is ever a bad thing even if the opinion itself isn’t great.) I’ve also seen some of our students go to train with her and then return with their dogs completely out of control. I’m not sure exactly what she’s doing in her classes, but it seems to be building speed without focus often enough that we’re catching the fallout. Apparently, she’s also started teaching this method where the dog is only allowed to take an obstacle if it’s been called first, so the handler would have to call each jump or the dog would stop short instead of driving the line. My mentor’s oldest dog was originally owned by one of Garrett’s apprentices, and he’s STILL a mess from that method even after a decade of re-training.

I haven’t seen much of her puppy raising/obedience training material except her Recallers promotional stuff, but it doesn’t seem much different from what everyone else does? For the price, I’d rather take a couple Fenzi courses at Gold.

spottytonguedog:

doggydayjob:

zookeeping:

l am watching my neighbors dog currently, he’s a 100lb big ol goof and when I went to get his walking stuff I realized they do the prong+ flexi-lead combo which I know is bad, but I don’t have any info about why exactly (I can sorta figure it makes the prong pretty much constantly straining on the dogs neck etc..) but I would love to try and leave them some information about switching him over to something safer 
So if you pro realdogtrainers out there have some links, or just info for me I would love to hear it and spread the information.


And no, I have not used the prong on him at all actually, he only has a flat collar and he does pull a bit but he stops after the initial excitement

There’s plenty of anti-flexi information on any retractable leash site. Here’s Flexi’s official warning page for their leashes. In addition to that, I’ve had some terrible personal experiences with Flexis. I was dragged by a dane mix as a teen, and I’ve gotten several burns from other people’s leashes. One of the trainers I work with watched a dog dart into the street and get run over while wearing a Flexi. One of our students came to class a few weeks ago with a huge burn across his leg from a Flexi on a dog that tried to jump on his puppy. When Maulkin was a puppy, he was also burned on the inside of his leg by a dog wearing a Flexi.

You’re right that the main problem with using a Flexi and a prong collar is the constant pressure. Besides being uncomfortable for the dog, it can create a “punishment callous” where the dog gets used to the constant, low-level pain of the prong collar being tugged tight by the Flexi, so it takes much harsher corrections to discourage pulling. Just like Flexis reward dogs for pulling on leash by letting them move farther for pulling harder, they reward dogs for pulling against their prong collars by allowing them to move forward. Prong collars are also much more dangerous than flat collars. If the dog takes off and hits the end of the Flexi, the prongs could become embedded in the dog’s neck.

Well, I agree with most of this, I do not agree that it rewards them for pulling harder. I taught my dog NOT to pull using a Flexi. There’s a HUGE difference in pressure between the light pull of a flexi and pulling on either the end of it or the end of a 6-foot leash. Dogs can easily learn the difference.

I also had scars on my wrist for 2 years from a leash burn…from a 6-foot leash that got wrapped around my wrist and hurt my knee falling when I got tangled up in a long line (because I was told Flexis were the devil and I should never ever use them and should instead use a long line). My dog almost got hit when she darted into the road to chase a truck (first few weeks I had her). She was on a 6-foot leash. No leash is perfect and accidents happen with all sorts of leashes and stupid people do all sorts of stupid things no matter what leash they use.

That being said, prongs + flexi is a recipe for some major issues. If the dog is prone to pulling hard or bolting, it could really damage a dog’s neck. I don’t like prongs anyway but the combination of the two together is frightening.

I think whether the dog learns to pull based on the constant pressure is based on the sensitivity and size of the dog. For small dogs, even a little pressure seems like a lot. Personally, I’ve never seen a small dog on a Flexi that wasn’t a terrible puller on any leash, but I’m sure they could be trained to be more sensitive to pressure. For larger dogs, the level of constant pressure is probably fairly negligible unless a corrective collar is being used, since that would essentially keep the collar actively correcting the dog at all times.

And yes, absolutely, any dog can run out into traffic on any kind of leash. It just happens more frequently when the dog is 20 ft away from their handler instead of 6 ft, since longer leashes offer less control to the handler. And yes, same problem with long lines; they shouldn’t be used around busy roads especially with untrained dogs!

zookeeping:

l am watching my neighbors dog currently, he’s a 100lb big ol goof and when I went to get his walking stuff I realized they do the prong+ flexi-lead combo which I know is bad, but I don’t have any info about why exactly (I can sorta figure it makes the prong pretty much constantly straining on the dogs neck etc..) but I would love to try and leave them some information about switching him over to something safer 
So if you pro realdogtrainers out there have some links, or just info for me I would love to hear it and spread the information.


And no, I have not used the prong on him at all actually, he only has a flat collar and he does pull a bit but he stops after the initial excitement

There’s plenty of anti-flexi information on any retractable leash site. Here’s Flexi’s official warning page for their leashes. In addition to that, I’ve had some terrible personal experiences with Flexis. I was dragged by a dane mix as a teen, and I’ve gotten several burns from other people’s leashes. One of the trainers I work with watched a dog dart into the street and get run over while wearing a Flexi. One of our students came to class a few weeks ago with a huge burn across his leg from a Flexi on a dog that tried to jump on his puppy. When Maulkin was a puppy, he was also burned on the inside of his leg by a dog wearing a Flexi.

You’re right that the main problem with using a Flexi and a prong collar is the constant pressure. Besides being uncomfortable for the dog, it can create a “punishment callous” where the dog gets used to the constant, low-level pain of the prong collar being tugged tight by the Flexi, so it takes much harsher corrections to discourage pulling. Just like Flexis reward dogs for pulling on leash by letting them move farther for pulling harder, they reward dogs for pulling against their prong collars by allowing them to move forward. Prong collars are also much more dangerous than flat collars. If the dog takes off and hits the end of the Flexi, the prongs could become embedded in the dog’s neck.

angerinyourbones:

magnumoctopus medication is something I talk about at nearly every bmod consult I do. I always stress it is not a magic solution (although with some dogs it really does seem like it ) and should always be used with both behavior modification and management.

It should absolutely not be a “last resort” and I hate that it is seen as such. It can help dogs so dramatically. My mentor put it the best way “sometimes the world is just a little too bright for certain dogs, and those dogs need some sunglasses to get through their days.”

I hate the way medication is viewed, as well. Back when spike was on an SSRI I had someone tell me to take him off cold turkey and replace it with fucking Rescue Remedy.

Medication can play such an important part in rehabilitation. It’s incredibly frustrating that people see it as some sort of bandaid or lazy way to train. It’s not lazy; medication minimizes the dog’s suffering and maximizes the effectiveness of the training/bmod regime. If a dog’s brain cannot function normally, remedying that situation needs to be top priority before any training takes place! Refusing some dogs psychiatric medication is like agility training a dog with a broken leg: It’s possible to an extent, but it’s not humane or efficient.

Anonymous Asked
Questionwhere do you work? i thought you did photography as a job! Answer

angerinyourbones:

doggydayjob:

angerinyourbones:

doggydayjob:

angerinyourbones:

wherehorsesmeetdogs:

baddognono:

wherehorsesmeetdogs:

ladypadawan:

haleysolo:

wherehorsesmeetdogs:

boldhope:

wherehorsesmeetdogs:

I do do photography as a job. Sadly, photography generally works in seasons since I only do outdoor shoots and it gets too hot in the summer. While I do shoots in the summer, they are very few and not nearly enough to pay for my house and Charlie’s board.

Anyway back to your question, I work at a veterinary clinic. I only work there two days a week though, as I have a secondary income and the other girls need the hours more than I do.  I love the job soooo much. It’s made me realize that I really do want to work with animals in the future, which means I’ll probably open a dog daycare/boarding/training/grooming facility in the future (as well as a pet store). 

This is likely my last month there though, it’s too long a drive for very little money. I’ll probably start working at my college library in the fall, which saves me a drive, is a more flexible schedule and I’ll earn the same amount of $/hr. :D

Let’s go into business together! :D

Yassss! Seriously my dream business partner would be someone like you! Haha I really want to do this in the long run, I just have to figure out my life first :D Which reminds me,
haleysolo
don’t you want to open a petstore too?

Yes, yes I do. One that is based on the best nutrition for your pet and positive reinforcement. The three of us can just get together and open a place up together. Kay, go!

I wanted to open a pet store haha. But decided on a daycare/boarding facility! :D

Yay! Another one! :D I actually want to do both but I’d like the  boarding/daycare facility to include grooming and training. So we’ll see. I don’t even know where to begin.

haha maybe it’s all of us that have this dream. I have some makeshift plans draw out for a boarding/daycare facility with both grooming, training areas (inside and outside) and a pet store area. Even though I won’t be able to make it come true any time soon.

ME TOO. I have a bunch of different layouts I’ve thought of. I’ve planned sooo darn much for this haha. 

It sucks that this dream is soooo far off though :(

I want a training center with retail attached and kennels for board & train.

Never working daycare again though.

I’m on the fence about board and train, but daycare is the absolute worst.

I think board and train is great for intense bmod - with transfer sessions for the owner of course. I don’t like the whole “drop your puppy off for bootcamp!” Thing but I currently offer day training for bmod (most reactivity) and the dogs get much farther in a shorter period of time than just plain in home.

I could absolutely see it working with bmod. I think the bootcamp idea is so prominent, it would be hard to offer bmod sessions without clients fussing over how limited it is. We don’t offer any board and train, and people still fuss at us that they have to actually ATTEND A CLASS. Does that ever happen with you?

I’m only doing in home and day training currently (going to start puppy classes and reactive dog classes soon though) but as far as I know my mentor(s) has never had an issue. It helps that we hold our classes at pet stores or vet clinics so they can pick up dog food at the same time as class.

Hah, that’s a nice perk! It’s generally grooming clients that are like, “Oh, you do training, too? So I can just leave my dog with you after his groom and you’ll train him?” But we also get the occasional pet dog person with an adult dog they want trained but don’t actually want to do the work themselves. The bmod people are generally pretty great about wanting to be involved unless they don’t know they actually have a bmod issue.