wherehorsesmeetdogs:

I cannot deal with people that tell other people they shouldn’t comfort their dogs in high stress situations. 

It’s not going to teach your dog that it’s okay to be scared, it’s going to teach them that you are a reliable safety net which can come in handy in dangerous/scary situations.

It’s like telling me I can’t comfort my niece or nephew when they get scared, they won’t understand why I’m ignoring them and get more scared.

We went to the bigger park today and hiked through the little forest, splashed in the disgusting river, and played disc down a big hill. Maulkin’s stamina was much better than usual, and he wasn’t upset by any of the dogs, feral cats, or people running around. (Both signs that he was relaxed for a change!) We went to the bigger park today and hiked through the little forest, splashed in the disgusting river, and played disc down a big hill. Maulkin’s stamina was much better than usual, and he wasn’t upset by any of the dogs, feral cats, or people running around. (Both signs that he was relaxed for a change!) We went to the bigger park today and hiked through the little forest, splashed in the disgusting river, and played disc down a big hill. Maulkin’s stamina was much better than usual, and he wasn’t upset by any of the dogs, feral cats, or people running around. (Both signs that he was relaxed for a change!) We went to the bigger park today and hiked through the little forest, splashed in the disgusting river, and played disc down a big hill. Maulkin’s stamina was much better than usual, and he wasn’t upset by any of the dogs, feral cats, or people running around. (Both signs that he was relaxed for a change!)

We went to the bigger park today and hiked through the little forest, splashed in the disgusting river, and played disc down a big hill. Maulkin’s stamina was much better than usual, and he wasn’t upset by any of the dogs, feral cats, or people running around. (Both signs that he was relaxed for a change!)

allusearthgrowths:

I need help. My dog, Murphy, who is nine months old, just cannot stop drinking water. Like, this is way past normal. He drinks and drinks and drinks and drinks until its all gone. And then he just pees everywhere. Uncontrollably pees everywhere. Like, he’ll just be walking and it’ll just kind of sprinkle out. He knows he’s not supposed to pee in the house and so he looks super guilty and I can’t punish him for that because he’s not actually controlling it. But it’s turned into quite a problem. He’ll gulp it all. He’s even learned to lift the toilet seat lid. My other dog, Ziggy, also drank and drank and drank but then he grew out of it and now knows when to stop. Murphy does not. I don’t think anything is physically wrong with him because he’s still kind of too young for all of that, but I think it’s more of a behavioral thing. He just doesn’t stop. I’m afraid he’s going to get bloat, but I know there are water bowls that are designed to prevent that. It’s just a problem because he doesn’t know when to stop and I really wish he would learn. Help me please, dog people.

Urinary tract infections are incredibly common in puppies and young dogs. This sounds like it could be very serious, and I highly recommend taking Murphy to a vet as soon as possible. If your vet verifies Murphy is healthy, then you can consider limiting his water intake to certain times of day to help with house training.

stupidfishyface:

doggydayjob:

stupidfishyface:

doggydayjob this is new…. Also broke her crate pan and busted the front door off. We put her on fluoxetine starting yesterday, but I’m seriously considering getting a UT behaviorist involved because she’s going to bite someone or another dog…

Medication isn’t going to work overnight; you have to give it time. However because this is a new behaviour, and a pretty severe reaction, you should tell your vet (or whoever prescribed the fluoxetine) about it in case they think it’s a reaction to the drug. If you can afford a behaviourist, absolutely go for it! Having someone there who can actually see what’s going on and interact with your dog (and help coach you in person) can really make all the difference. I’m really not sure what caused this reaction, so I can’t suggest any way to deal with it. It looks like separation anxiety; but if you think it was an aggressive reaction to an outside trigger, such a severe reaction definitely needs a specialist to treat.

This part was separation anxiety, which she’s always had but over the past few weeks it’s been escalating to the point that I’ll bring her to work with me just so I can watch her. My family doesn’t help, they just reinforce her behaviors and so I have to just keep her in my room while I’m gone. She’s started growling at people when they touch her feet or if they trip on her or something (she ground her nails past the quick when she did that so I know they don’t feel good but that’s new). She even snapped at me when I tried to look at them which is extremely out of character for her because normally ican do whatever I want to her. She snaps/snarls/growls at my cat when she’s laying down(but is fine with her when they’re just on the ground together, they even used to cuddle??) so as soon as I can get her to a behaviorist at UT I will, but unfortunately bills come first. Her thundershirt helps, but is there anything you could suggest that would keep everyone safe and not as stresses until ican get her there?

If the growling over her feet only started after she hurt her nails (and likely her paw pads), she’s probably just being defensive because she’s in pain. If you think that’s likely a contributing factor, you could ask your vet for a mild pain medication to help her feel more comfortable.

For the separation anxiety right now, it sounds like your best bet is to bring her to work with you when you can. You could try leaving her at home and crated with someone else to watch her if she’s able to be fairly calm in that environment. (You could also leave her loose with someone else, but if you think that might be a bite risk, it’s better to keep her crated, penned, or tethered out of reach.) You might even consider talking to your vet about getting a mild sedative that’s safe to use over longer periods to help your dog cope when you have to leave her.

Because it sounds like your dog’s behaviour is getting worse, you’ll have to be very careful not to overwhelm her when you’re doing behavioural therapy. For example, you may give your dog a long-time treat (like a raw bone), step out of the room (not even the house) for half a second, and then return and take the bone. If she’s stops eating and gets upset when you’re gone for half a second, you may need to even just APPROACH the door and then return and take the treat. This is where a consultation with a behaviourist will be really valuable; they’ll be able to customize a protocol to your dog and your situation.

their-life-is-a-movie:

Today me and beasty went walkies. Nice quiet calming walk. We practiced for dog school tomorrow. I hope we can move up to class one tomorrow.

He has;
Heel, sit, right about turn, stay, left turn down to a T.
We are working on stand, he will stand if I put my hand to stop him sitting, he’s getting better, but me having my hand their is allowed up until class two.

For the stand, are you using a lure or a target to get the position? If so, setting the target too high causes the dog to sit. Instead, try moving the target a little bit lower and out to encourage your dog to kick his feet out. Also be sure you’re starting and ending the stand behaviour with a sit or down to emphasize standing as a stationary position. (I’m sure you know most of that already. Dogs popping into a sit or down is something most of my students struggle with when first teaching stand, so, ya know, may as well repeat it here jic.)

stupidfishyface:

doggydayjob this is new…. Also broke her crate pan and busted the front door off. We put her on fluoxetine starting yesterday, but I’m seriously considering getting a UT behaviorist involved because she’s going to bite someone or another dog…

Medication isn’t going to work overnight; you have to give it time. However because this is a new behaviour, and a pretty severe reaction, you should tell your vet (or whoever prescribed the fluoxetine) about it in case they think it’s a reaction to the drug. If you can afford a behaviourist, absolutely go for it! Having someone there who can actually see what’s going on and interact with your dog (and help coach you in person) can really make all the difference. I’m really not sure what caused this reaction, so I can’t suggest any way to deal with it. It looks like separation anxiety; but if you think it was an aggressive reaction to an outside trigger, such a severe reaction definitely needs a specialist to treat.

gotthatsouthernhospitality:

Dog smart people help
Is this a dominance fight or …..? I think it is but idk
My bulldogs libby(5 yo American bulldog) and Stoney(6 yo olde English bulldog) have “fights” all the time.
It’s mostly when I’m hugging or playing with my dog Libby, Stoney will walk near or up to Libby and Libby starts snarling and wanting to attack her and of course Stoney doesn’t back down?
Dominance or aggression?

That sounds like classic resource guarding. Resource guarding is a fear-based behaviour where the dog is nervous someone else will take away a valuable resource, so they try to defend it. It’s incredibly common in multi-dog households, and even very young puppies can display it. Resource guarding usually occurs over food or toys, but it’s not uncommon for dogs to guard their people, beds, access to outside (or other doorways), or property.

It actually sounds like both dogs are showing resource guarding behaviour. Libby is obviously defending her access to you, but it sounds like Stoney may be trying to force Libby away from you when you interact too much.

The protocol for treating resource guarding against other dogs is pretty easy, but you have to use careful management to prevent a fight or any danger to yourself or either dog. I’d recommend having both dogs on leash, one sturdily tethered, and the other on leash with you (or tether both dogs if you feel you may drop the leash or be dragged). An alternative is to have one dog behind a gate so they can see, but not access, you and the other dog. The basic protocol is to pay attention to one dog (the dog leashed with you), and then toss very delicious treats (like cheese or chicken) to the tethered dog. To make this as easy as possible for the tethered dog, you can start by just approaching, looking at, or briefly stroking the dog that’s with you. If you make it so that you paying attention to one dog predicts the other dog getting something really good, the dog not getting your attention will happily anticipate you paying attention to the other dog because it means they get something good. So instead of getting upset you’re paying attention to another dog, your resource guarding dog will start to think that’s actually really great because it’s a huge pay-off for them.

And because I’m not sure how clear that is, I’m going to write out the protocol with your dog’s names, but keep in mind you should do this with both dogs playing each role. You’d start with Libby tethered across the room and Stoney on leash with you. You’d briefly give Stoney a pat, and then toss a bit of cheese to Libby. Do this several times with the same brief interaction with Stoney, and you should notice Libby paying less attention to what you’re doing and more attention to where the cheese may appear. (This is a sign Libby is relaxing.) When Libby seems relaxed, you can pay a bit more attention to Stoney (maybe give him a solid stroke instead of a simple pat) before tossing Libby a treat. Gradually work up until you can make a big fuss with Stoney and Libby waits patiently for her reward without getting upset. Try to keep your training sessions short (only a few minutes at a time), and separate both dogs before releasing them to minimize tension between them. (So take Libby out of the room and release her before releasing Stoney.) Remember to expect set-backs in your training and make things easier for your dogs if need be. Just like people, dogs can have bad days.

I hope that helps a bit. If any of that was unclear, please let me know. Also, if either of your dogs show resource guarding behaviour towards you, or you feel overwhelmed with their training, find a positive reinforcement trainer or veterinary behaviourist in your area to help. Good luck!

jocks-on-4-paws:

I’m contemplating trying to put deep calm breathing (like I would do for meditation) on cue for Prowl to help keep calm before the OMGFUNs! Problem is he gets reved up training so not sure how to reward.

You could try capturing? Then you’d just be rewarding one repetition at a time outside of formal training. It’ll probably take a while for Prowl to figure it out, but it might be possible.

Anonymous Asked
QuestionHi I recently adopted a dog (he's about 3) and I was wondering if you had any good resources on training? A lot of info out there and I've looked into a few trainers, one uses the prong method which I really don't like, the other said he's too old which I just don't really agree with. I don't know what sources to really trust. Thanks!! Answer

Sorry, it’s taken me a while to answer you. It sounds like you’ve already made some great decisions about training your dog. It can be really hard to stand up to a trainer and tell them you disagree (especially about the use of force, as that can be very intimidating). You should be proud of yourself for standing so strong!

For training the average pet dog, Family Friendly Dog Training by Patricia McConnell is a very easy, light read with great and practical advice for everyday problem behaviours and teaching basic obedience. If you need something much more detailed or need an especially highly-trained dog and are willing to put in the effort, you can’t go wrong with Sue Ailsby’s Training Levels.

For online resources, I love Training Positive's tutorials on YouTube for basic obedience training. His style is very calm and straight-forward. For teaching more advanced behaviour or behaviour modification (or just for a second opinion on how to train basic behaviours), definitely check out Kikopup's videos.

If you’d like more general resources or need resources for teaching a particular behaviour or dealing with a particular problem, please let me know. Good luck!

workingwithjayne:

Tumblr stop recommending aversive training blogs pls and ty

This goes double for YouTube.